Tree buds – haibun for dVerse

Before this final flurry of winter, I was starting to imagine a faint haze of green over the hedgerows, a softening of the winterdark of the bare twigs. It won’t be long before that green is definite, and spring starts unfurling and stretching out across the landscape.

Three weeks ago we planted two new apple trees, grafts from our old Bramley. One went in behind the barn, and one on the steep part of the field. Over the last few days we’ve had winds from the Baltic, temperatures dropping down well below zero, snow, and freezing rain. It’s a hard time to be an orchardist. Robert Frost’s been sitting on my shoulder, as his namesake stalks my orchard. If those tiny buds are lost or damaged, there’ll be no crop worth speaking of this year. All I can do is wait, and hope, and trust.

I can’t protect you
You choose your time to open
Tree-bud, small but strong

A haibun for Haibun Monday at dVerse. We are asked to consider tree-buds, and the powerful metaphors they bring with them. Thank you, Victoria, for a lovely prompt. 

27 thoughts on “Tree buds – haibun for dVerse

  1. The fruit trees that were in blossom on the Mediterranean side have all copped it. They had a lot of snow and heavy frost. If the apples weren’t in flower you should be okay. I think..

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  2. Hope, wait, trust….lovely haibun and I loved the details in it. Hopefully the buds have developed enough to be killed by the snow and frost. My plum trees are usually the second thing to bloom after the flowering quince. Last year the buds were all killed so no plums. I know the feeling you expressed in your wonderful haiku.

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  3. How lovely a haibun you wrote, Sarah. You put me in that orchard. Apple trees are hard here in the South to raise. I had one that was supposed to be a Red Delicious, but it was something else, don’t know but green stripped and hard fruit but sweet and juicy. It died last year after 20 years. Planted 2 fujis two years ago and two Black Arkansas, one Fuji died and one Arkansas. I’m not a great orchardist you could say. Nothing better than a fresh apple off a tree.

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