Thirst

You fling it open for the first time/ but I’m gone

M Kahf ~ Wall

Why did you always keep the window closed?
What did you fear? I’m asking – look – she’s
barefoot in the field, she’s dusty,
arms scratched, squinting at the sun.
Didn’t you notice she was always gazing
out of the window? That she itched and twitched
in rhythm with the blackbird, that she sighed.


Was it the sound of sunlight that you hated?
Or the scent of bees? or the blue screaming
of the sky? Tell me. I’m waiting.

For Laura at dVerse. Thinking about how we end poems. Laura gives us lines to springboard from and use as epigraph

28 thoughts on “Thirst

  1. This is incredibly deep and gorgeously worded, Sarah! I can feel the emotions, the thirst for more as the questions graze its surface. Especially love; “Didn’t you notice she was always gazing out of the window? That she itched and twitched in rhythm with the blackbird, that she sighed.” 💝💝

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  2. I’m intrigued by these three people, or perhaps there are only two, and their relationship. To leap out of the window and chase blackbirds is incomprehensible to some. I do like the ‘itched and twitched’—it’s exactly how I describe Finbar when he’s sending out unsubtle signals that he wants to be off his lead.

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  3. The emotions, it all feels so tragic like an end. Almost as if the question can’t have an answer because the person doesn’t have one; it’s poignant in that way, letting the silence fall between the questions accepting it as your answer. Very eloquently penned and stirring.

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  4. “Was it the sound of sunlight that you hated?” Oh that is precious. As a friend of someone who has synesthesia I know the answer to this from their view. I also feel this for myself in the push me/pull you duality of my own thoughts at times. Your verse is striking.

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  5. Was it the sound of sunlight that you hated?
    Or the scent of bees? or the blue screaming
    of the sky? Tell me. I’m waiting.

    Wow. This stanza makes my brain explode with profound awe and appreciation.

    🤯
    -David

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  6. This poem seems to be about a complex relationship, with the speaker asking questions that may or may not be answered, and sometimes directly addressing the other person and sometimes referring to her in the third person. It could be a mother frustrated with her daughter – or a daughter frustrated with a demented mother. Whichever it is, I can feel it, Sarah.

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  7. What a wonderful read! I was transfixed. To me, this was the persona in later years confronting the person in her past who had overpowered her longings and wanting to know why. There is so much of an undercurrent of grief, of anger, of mere curiosity here that its just heart-grabbing.

    Liked by 1 person

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