Halloween Haibun!

My childhood Halloweens smelled of burnt turnip – much harder to carve a lantern from than pumpkins, but much spookier, too. They tasted of wet apples and toffee. My husband’s Halloweens were colcannon and barmbrack, and handfuls of nuts and raisins. My children had a bit of all that, over-laid with pumpkins and cheap sweets and tacky costumes.

My son was never bothered about Halloween. He doesn’t like dressing up and doesn’t like sweets. He was cajoled and coaxed along by his big sister (who knew he’d hand his booty over to her). The last costume she persuaded him into consisted of his usual clothes and a single black line drawn around his neck. “I’m the ghost of someone who had their head cut off”, he announced at every door we called at.

amber light
a hand reaches out
darkness falls

Frank is hosting at dVerse tonight, and we’re writing Halloween haibuns.

Grown up – quadrille for dVerse

My muck magnet
mud splattered
puddle stomping
jam smeared
crumb dropping
sticky fingered
paint splashing
pen scrawling
finger printing
juice spilling
boy
became
smart shirted
svelte suited
shiny shoed
smooth socked
slick haired
sparkly smiling
sweet scented
freshly shampooed
softly spoken
smooth talking
man

A quadrille is a 44 word poem. We write them at dVerse. De is hosting tonight, and our magic word is “magnet”.

The Storyteller speaks.

When we look at him through the wrong end of the telescope of time, what will we see? A lazy, luxury loving coward? No – I can’t allow that. History will see a brave and handsome prince who sacrificed himself for his people. And her? A square-jawed, argumentative woman? No, a fragile flower who takes the throne after her brother’s death in battle.

I make the stories, and the stories become truth. I bend things a little here, twist them there: our last queen was rescued from a tower by the king. That’s a good story that became history. Everyone knows it.

I invented it.

I don’t care about the kingdom, or the king, or the princess. I only care about the story. The prince will die in battle, his sister will become queen, and future generations will weep to hear it. Fetch my pen. 

Kim is hosting prosery at dVerse tonight. A story told in 144 words, including a quotation: “We look at him through the wrong end of the telescope of time”.

Eat the Storms – The Podcast – Episode 5- National Poetry Day 2020

Tomorrow is National Poetry Day in the UK and so this week’s podcast is dropping tomorrow to celebrate and I am surrounded by 4 guest poets from as far as New Zealand and as close as Dublin City centre who share their poems on movement, change, time and loss. Join us tomorrow and meantime- Stay […]

Eat the Storms – The Podcast – Episode 5- National Poetry Day 2020

Damien is ‘casting again. If you like to listen to poetry, I do recommend checking it out.

EAT THE STORMS – EPISODE 3 – OUT NOW

Episode 3 of the Podcast Eat The Storms is on your local platform or coming soon. Definitely on Spotify already and it is packed tight with talent… Thank you to the featured Poets Ankh Spice, Sarah Connor, Ruairí De Barra, Eilín de Paor, Jane Dougherty, Kevin Bateman, Catherine Ann Cullen and Aisling Keogh

EAT THE STORMS – EPISODE 3 – OUT NOW

Nine and nine

Laura’s hosting at dVerse tonight. She always comes up with interesting and challenging prompts – I think of them as architectural. Tonight we’re thinking about nines – nine line poems and nonets. Laura has given us some lines from great poems to use as the basis for our own work. I couldn’t resist having a go at both halves of the prompt.

Here’s my first one. The first line is taken from W.S. Merwin’s “To the Light of September”/

Summer fading

It seems as though you are still summer
clinging to the last pink roses,
but the early morning chill
lasts a little longer
every day. Autumn
is so close now,
cold fingers
sprinkling
gold.

And here’s the second, which is based on this line: Those/ pale /flowers /might /still /have/ time/ to /fruit from Karina Borowicz’s ‘September Tomatoes

Gooseflight

Those geese flying overhead
pale wings spread out, like
flowers on a blue bedspread
might fly on. They are so strong, they
still have miles to go. It’s
time to seek out warmth,
to hunker down. Autumn’s brought
fruit and frost and morning mist.

The Leap

I have a poem in this month’s issue of Visual Verse, in which writers have been inspired by an image by Andi Sapey and Other Dance Art. I’m in great company again, with poets such as Misky Braendeholm and Sarah Connor. You can find my poem on page 22 of Visual Verse Volume 7 Chapter […]

The Leap

Beyond the breakers what do you see? Share what you love about the sea using #NationalMarineWeek 25th July- 9th August, more like two weeks poetry and artwork challenge I’d love to hear all about your favourite marine wildlife, the actions you take to help our sea life, and what the sea means to you. Furst Seven Days: Saturday: Seawatch, Sunday: Rock-pools, Monday: Seabirds And Seals, Tuesday: The Strandline, Wednesday: Sand Dunes And Salt-Marshes, Thursday: Fish-Life, Friday: What Marine Life Does For Us. Please submit your poems and artwork by DM to me, or send a message via my WordPress “The Wombwell Rainbow” contact screen or my FB “Paul Brookes-Writer and Photographer”. Today: Saturday: Seawatch. What can you see out at sea? How would you describe it? Beyond the breakers what do you see? — The Wombwell Rainbow

Quote

Saturday: Seawatch – Voyages With My Daughter Voyage 1 The best sailors, Aurelia-Noa’s father says as he unties a reluctant nappy, are those whose days sway to the same rhythm their nights undulate and those who startles in sleep seeing lighthouses flashing out a rocky cladach and those who may haven’t seen any sea. The […]

via Beyond the breakers what do you see? Share what you love about the sea using #NationalMarineWeek 25th July- 9th August, more like two weeks poetry and artwork challenge I’d love to hear all about your favourite marine wildlife, the actions you take to help our sea life, and what the sea means to you. Furst Seven Days: Saturday: Seawatch, Sunday: Rock-pools, Monday: Seabirds And Seals, Tuesday: The Strandline, Wednesday: Sand Dunes And Salt-Marshes, Thursday: Fish-Life, Friday: What Marine Life Does For Us. Please submit your poems and artwork by DM to me, or send a message via my WordPress “The Wombwell Rainbow” contact screen or my FB “Paul Brookes-Writer and Photographer”. Today: Saturday: Seawatch. What can you see out at sea? How would you describe it? Beyond the breakers what do you see? — The Wombwell Rainbow

earthweal guest weekly challenge: LOOKING FOR A NEW HIERARCHY

Brendan was kind enough to let me guest host at Earthweal this week. It’s an interesting space full of interesting poets, and I’m constantly challenged and fulfilled by what I find there.

earthweal

by Sarah Connor

I first came across Maslow’s hierarchy at college. I didn’t think too much about it – I had a lot of facts to learn, and this was just another one. Two or three times in my life I’ve learned the triangle well enough to be able to answer a multiple-choice question on it, if it should happen to come up. It has face validity. What more do you want?

You know Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, right? It’s been around since 1943. It’s been meme-ed.

 

 

Maslow stated that you move up through the hierarchy. You need to have your physiological needs met first, then safety, then love and belonging, esteem, self-actualization. The big joke these days is that you need to add a further foundation layer, usually labelled “wi-fi”.

Obviously.

It wasn’t until I came across a random tweet the other day that I even questioned…

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